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Biography of Pamela Colman Smith


 

Hooker Family - Reverend Thomas Hooker (1586-1647), Immigrant Ancestor

 

Photograph of the Thomas Hooker Statue located on the grounds of the Old State House in Hartford, Connecticut. Reverend Hooker led a group of about 100 people from Massachusetts Colony, through what was then wilderness, to this site in June, 1636. Two years later, he preached the historic sermon which inspired the "Fundamental Orders of Connecticut," one of the first written constitutions in American history.

 

Descendants of Thomas Hooker

 

Generation No. 1

1. THOMAS1 HOOKER was born 1586 in England, and died 07 Jul 1647 in Farmington, Connecticut. He married SUSANNA GARBRAND.

Notes for THOMAS HOOKER:

The following information was taken from the Wikipedia website at the following URL:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Hooker

The Reverend Thomas Hooker (5 July 1586 7 July 1647) was a prominent Puritan religious and colonial leader, who founded the Colony of Connecticut in 1636 after dissenting with Puritan leaders in Massachusetts. He was known as an outstanding speaker and an advocate of universal Christian suffrage. Hooker also had a role in creating the "Fundamental Orders of Connecticut", one of the world's first written constitutions.

The following was taken from the book entitled The Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker, Hartford, Connecticut, 1586-1908 (1909):

1 Rev. Thomas Hooker, son of Thomas Hooker, born in England, about 1586, he entered Emanuel College, Cambridge in 1604. He received the degree of B. A. in 1608, the degree of M. A. in 1611, and entering upon a divinity course, he was elected a Fellow of the College. He left the College before completing the first course and receiving the degree of B. D. There are many reasons for supposing that he went from the college direct to Chelmsford and remained there until being silenced, arrested and placed under bonds to appear before the Ecclesiastical Court; he fled to Holland. Came to New England on ship "Griffin" 1633.

The name of his first wife is unknown and nothing of parentage of his second wife, whose name was Susanna '

His second wife survived him, and though nothing is positively known about her, there are many reasons for believing that in later years she became the wife of Elder William Goodwin and died at Farmington, Conn. He died at Hartford, Conn., July 7, 1647, age 61. (See Introduction.)

CHILDREN OF THOMAS HOOKER:

By 1st wife:

Joanna, b. probably about 1615 to 1616.

Mary.

By 2nd wife:

John, d. at Mazeworth, Bucks, Eng., 1684.

Sarah, b. Little Baddow, England, 1628; d. Little Baddow, 1629.

Sarah, No. 2, b. Little Baddow, England, 1629-30.

Samuel, b. 1633.

 

Child of THOMAS HOOKER and SUSANNA GARBRAND is:

2. i. SAMUEL2 HOOKER, b. 1633, Hartford, Connecticut; d. 06 Nov 1697, Farmington, Connecticut.

 

Generation No. 2

2. SAMUEL2 HOOKER (THOMAS1) was born 1633 in Hartford, Connecticut, and died 06 Nov 1697 in Farmington, Connecticut. He married MARY WILLET 22 Sep 1658 in Plymouth, Massachusetts. She was born 10 Nov 1637 in Plymouth, Massachusetts, and died 24 Jun 1712 in Norwalk, Connecticut.

Notes for SAMUEL HOOKER:

The following is taken from the book entitled The Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker, Hartford, Connecticut, 1586-1908 (1909):

Samuel Hooker (Thomas), son of Rev. Thomas and Susannah Hooker, of Hartford, Colony of Conn., born 1633; married Sept. 22, 1658, Mary Willet, eldest daughter of Capt. Thomas and Mary (Brown) Willet of Plymouth, Mass., born Nov. 10, 1637, at Plymouth.

Rev. Samuel Hooker was aged 64, at the time of his death in 1697, from which it appears that he was born in 1633, but whether before the family left England, or after their arrival in New England is not known, though it is generally supposed that he was born at Newtowne (Cambridge), Mass. He entered Harvard College in 1651, and graduated in 1653. He entered the ministry in 1657, and preached at Plymouth, Mass., though probably not regularly settled there. He was invited to settle at Springfield, Mass., but declined the invitation and remained at Plymouth until he removed to Farmington, Conn., in 1661, where he succeeded his brother-in-law Rev. Roger Newton and became the second minister of the place and remained there until his death in 1697.

He was famous as an eloquent preacher and Mather in his "Magnolia" says of him. "Thus we have to this day among us our dead Hooker, yet living in his worthy son Samuel Hooker, an able, faithful, useful minister at Farmington, in the Colony of Connecticut."

Capt. Thomas Willet, whose daughter became the wife of Rev. Samuel Hooker, was at that time an energetic and thriving merchant at Plymouth. He succeeded Capt. Miles Standish in command of the famous military company of Plymouth, and he afterward became the first mayor of the city of New York.

The marriage of Rev. Samuel Hooker and Mary Willet was undoubtedly celebrated in a proper manner, for an account of it is handed down in the Willet family, concluding the ceremony with, "And Samuel and Mary did then brew a great bowl of punch."

They had eleven children, nine sons and two daughters, and from these sons come all Hookers who claim descent from Rev. Thomas Hooker. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Mary (Willet) Hooker, when 67 years old, married, Aug. 10, 1703, Rev. Thomas Buckingham of Saybrook, Conn. He died April 1, 1709, when she went to the home of her son-in-law Rev. Stephen Buckingham, the son of her late husband, and the husband of her own daughter, at Norwalk, Conn., where she remained until her death in 1712. Her grave is near the center of the old burying ground, near the present East Norwalk railway station.

Rev. Samuel Hooker occupied at Farmington, the parsonage which had been occupied by is predecessor, Rev. Roger Newton, on the East side of South Main Street and nearly opposite to the road going to the meadows across the stone bridge which now spans the Pequabuc river. This house stood a few feet northward from the site of the house so long occupied by Mr. Solomon Cowles, who was one of Mr. Hooker's descendants, and here Mr. Hooker died. He was succeeded at Farmington by Rev. Samuel Whitman whose grandfather was Mr. Hooker's cousin.

No stone marks Mr. Hooker's grave, but well attested tradition points out the place, as at the south side of the grave of Rev. Mr. Whitman, which is appropriately marked.

Mr. Whitman like Mr. Hooker, died while the minister of the town, and tradition says he was buried by the side of Mr. Hooker.

Of the characteristics and personal appearance of Rev. Samuel Hooker's wife, we have no positive record. There exists however some old data and memoranda, which enable us to form a seemingly fair conclusion. Her mother is described as a woman of great beauty and stateliness, one describing her as "possessed of beauty and majesty almost divine."

Mrs. Hooker's sister, Martha, was the first wife of Judge Saffin. After her death he married twice again, and he has left a record written after the marriage to his 3rd wife, that upon the anniversary of the death of his first wife, it was his custom to seclude himself and give way to his "inconsolable grief for the irreparable loss he had sustained in the death of his beloved Martha."

Mrs. Hooker had two daughters, the eldest, Mary, married Rev. James Pierpont of New Haven, and the Pierpont family still have her portrait, from which we form the opinion that she was a woman of uncommon beauty.

The other daughter married Rev. Stephen Buckingham, and settled at Norwalk, Conn., and the annals of Norwalk record that she was accounted the most accomplished lady that had ever come to Norwalk, while the traditions of the place still preserve the fame of the beauty and stately grace of "Dame Buckingham."

Rev. Samuel Hooker died at Farmington, Nov. 6, 1697, Mrs. Mary Willet (Hooker) Buckingham died at Norwalk, Conn., June 24, 1712.

CHILDREN of Rev. Samuel HOOKER and Mary Willet:

Thomas, b. Plymouth, Mass., June 10, 1659; d. Hartford, Conn., 1720; m. Mrs. Mary (Smith) Lord, 1686.

Samuel, b. Plymouth, Mass., May 29, 1661.

William, b. Farmington, Conn., May 16, 1663.

John, b. Farmington, Conn., Feby. 20, 1664 or 5.

James, b. Farmington, Conn., Oct. 27, 1666. 32 Roger, b. Farmington, Conn., Sept. 14, 1668; d. April 29, 1698. At the time of his death he was betrothed to Mary Standley of Hartford. She afterwards married his brother Nathaniel Hooker.

Nathaniel, b. Farmington, Conn., Sept. 18, 1671.

Mary, b. Farmington, Conn., July 3, 1673.

Hezekiah, b. Farmington, Conn., Nov. 7, 1675; d. Farmington, Conn., 1686.

Daniel, b. Farmington, Conn., Mar. 25, 1679.

Sarah, b. Farmington, Conn., May 5, 1681; d. Norwalk, Conn., 1759; m. Rev. Stephen Buckingham.  Reverend Buckingham was a graduate of Harvard College in 1693, and was a member of the Corporation of Yale College. He was pastor of the Church at Norwalk, Conn. He died Feb. 13, 1746. Sarah Buckingham was accounted the most accomplished lady that had ever come to Norwalk. The fame of "Dame Buckingham" is preserved in the annals of the old town, and the story of her stately grace is still remembered in the traditions of the place. Her husband and her mother are buried near each other in the old burying ground at East Norwalk, Conn., and it is probable that her grave is near these other two, but no stone marks the place.

 

Child of SAMUEL HOOKER and MARY WILLET is:

3. i. JOHN3 HOOKER, b. 20 Feb 1665, Farmington, Connecticut; d. 21 Feb 1746, Farmington, Connecticut.

 

Generation No. 3

3. JOHN3 HOOKER (SAMUEL2, THOMAS1) was born 20 Feb 1665 in Farmington, Connecticut, and died 21 Feb 1746 in Farmington, Connecticut. He married SARAH FLETCHER 24 Nov 1687 in Farmington, Connecticut. She was born 25 Jul 1669 in Farmington, Connecticut, and died 21 Feb 1743 in Farmington, Connecticut.

Notes for JOHN HOOKER:

The following is taken from the book entitled The Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker, Hartford, Connecticut, 1586-1908 (1909:

John Hooker, son of Rev. Samuel and Mary (Willet) Hooker of Farmington, Conn., born Feb. 20, 1664 or 1665; married Nov. 24, 1687, Abigail Standley, daughter of Capt. John and his second wife, Sarah (Fletcher) Standley, of Farmington, Conn., b. July 25, 1669, at Farmington. THe Honorable John Hooker, was one of the most noted men of his day. For many years he was the leading man of the town. He was the magistrate who did most of the business of the town and he was Judge of the Supreme Court of the Colony from 1724 to 1732. He was a member of the Lower House of the Assembly from 1699 to 1723. He then went into the Upper House. He served twenty-one sessions of which he was Clerk two sessions, and Speaker, six. He was chosen assistant in 1723, and rechosen annually for eleven years. He was on important committees and was frequently sent to settle difficulties in towns, churches, etc.; he was charged with important public trusts, etc., and the papers in file in the office of the Secretary of State, attest the carefulness, as well as the confidence, reposed in him.

When he married, his father purchased and gave him a site on the west side of the main street, some distance north of the Meeting House at Farmington, and here he built his house under the branches of a beautiful elm tree, where it soon became a center of generous hospitality, and a familiar gathering place for the sages of the town, who in the pleasant summer evenings seated under the leafy canopy of the Hooker Elm, discussed the passing events, while their long pipes gave forth clouds of fragrant incense, which curling upwards, dispensed itself among the leaves of the beautiful tree.

The "Hooker Elm" was a widely known feature of the pleasant street, famous through all the region round for its great beauty and the pleasant company which gathered under its canopy in the soft summer evenings.

In the course of events the estate passed on to Roger Hooker, a thorough gentleman of the old school, who prized the wide spreading "Hooker Elm," as his father had done, while he continued the far famed hospitality of the house, and greeting his friends under the beautiful tree, sped the time away with tale and jest, and merry quip. And again, another Roger, a polished gentleman, a Patriotic soldier, a delightful conversationalist, and a brilliant wit and a raconteur, did the honors of the house as his father and grand-father had done, and gathered his story loving, mirth appreciating friends beneath the famous "Hooker Elm."

Major Roger Hooker was the last Hooker occupant of the place and dying without issue in 1830, the hospitable mansion and its stately guardian, the "Hooker Elm," passed into other hands and eventually into the possession of Mr. William Gay. The old house was torn out, rebuilt and modernized until scarcely a feature of its Hooker character remained, and as if to obliterate all memories and lingering Hooker associations, because the beautiful tree interfered with making a straight path from the front door to the street, an axe was laid at the roots and the famous "Hooker Elm," like the generations that had gathered under its leafy canopy, was laid low in the dust. Peace to its ashes and the last vestige of the Hooker dynasty, together with the far famed beauty of the place, passed away.

A chronicler of those days left this account of Mr. Hooker:

"On Sunday the bell rang for a while for service and then commenced tolling. At the first stroke of the tolling Mr. Hooker issued from his house and proceeded to the Meeting House, and the minister in like manner started from his house, whichever arrived first at the Meeting House door awaited the arrival of the other; and together they entered the building, as they entered the door the bell stopped tolling, and all the congregation arose to their feet and remained standing while the two walked the aisle together. Mr. Hooker stopped at his pew door the first pew and waited until the minister ascended the pulpit stairs, then entering his pew, they both sat down at the same time and then the congregation seated itself. When the service was over, Mr. Hooker stepped outside his pew door, and this was a signal for the congregation to arise and remain standing, at the pew door Mr. Hooker remained until joined by the minister, when they walked down the aisle together to the door, where they took their stand, outside in good weather and inside in bad weather. When they were in place, this was a signal to the congregation, who until that time had remained standing in their pews. The pew doors were thrown open, and the people passed out, all bowing as they passed the minister and Mr. Hooker, many speaking and a few exchanging a hand shake. When the people were all out the minister and Mr. Hooker, bowing to each other, shook hands and then proceeded to their homes."

The chronicler also describes the ending of the Sunday rigidness:

"The holiness of the day was supposed to end at sunset, but not a child in the town dared to stir, until the signal came from Mr. Hooker that the day was ended. When the sun had sunk below the horizon, Mr. Hooker, coming to his door with his pipe in his hand, walked down the path to the gate and leaning over it rested his arms upon the top. The moment his arms touched the gate, open flew the doors and out came the children with a wild rush and shoutMr. Hooker was at his gate, Sunday was over. The shout was taken up and spread to the furtherest ends of the town with a rapidity that would almost put the telegram of the present day to the blush. Mr. Hooker with his pipe was at the gate and Sunday was ended."

Roger Hooker leaves this note of Mr. Hooker's appearance:

"Mr. John Hooker had dark hair and dark eyes, and a dignity in his air and expression that procured profound respect."

Another description of Mr. Hooker says:

"He was a fine looking man, tall, very erect, and had a prominent large nose.

Capt. John Standley, the father of Mrs. Hooker, was a man of wealth and high social position, who had won distinction as a lieutenant and captain in the Indian wars. The early settlers at Hartford spelled the name with a "d," and as they were educated men of high standing, etc., it may properly be supposed that they were correct in so spelling. The history of the Stanley family however assumes that they were wrong and the spelling a mistake, etc., and endeavors to trace the family to the family of Stanley of England. It has since come to light that Sir John Standley was an officer in Cromwell's army, that the family was then an old one and was not known to have any connection with the famous Stanley family. Probably this Standley family was the one from which the Connecticut settler came and their spelling of the name was correct. The name in America has now become irrevocably changed to Stanley.

Another daughter, Elizabeth Standley, married deacon John North, and was the grand-mother of Col. Jeremiah Wadsworth the famous Commissary General of the Revolutionary War. Col. Wadsworth married Mahitable Russell of Middletown, Conn., a descendant from Rev. Thomas Hooker, and thus while there was no cousinship between Col. Wadsworth and his wife there was a cousinship between each of them and the descendants from Hon. John Hooker and their children bore a double relationship to this branch of the Hooker family.

Col. Wadsworth, son of Daniel Wadsworth, founded the Wadsworth Atheneum at Hartford and presented it to the city, thus erecting a noble monument to the Wadsworth family, and one in which the Hookers of that branch have a kinship interest. John Hooker died at Farmington, Feb. 21, 1745 or 1746. His wife died at Farmington, Feb. 21, 1742 or 1743.

CHILDREN OF JOHN HOOKER:

Hezekiah, b. Farmington, Conn., Oct. 14, 1688.

Abigail, b. Farmington, Conn., May. 25, 1691; d. Farmington, Conn., Sept. 30, 1692.

John, b. Farmington, Conn., Dec. 17, 1693; d. Farmington, Conn., Dec. 26, 1693.

John, No. 2, b. Farmington, Conn., Mar. 6, 1695.

Abigail, b. Farmington, Conn., June 14, 1698.

Mary, b. Farmington, Conn., June 11, 1700.

Sarah, b. Farmington, Conn., Sept. 7, 1702.

Joseph, b. Farmington, Conn., Feb. 15, 1705.

Ruth, b. Farmington, Conn., April 16, 1708.

Roger, b. Farmington, Conn., Sept. 17, 1710.

 

Child of JOHN HOOKER and SARAH FLETCHER is:

4. i. HEZEKIAH4 HOOKER, b. 14 Oct 1688, Farmington, Connecticut; d. 20 Feb 1756, Woodbury, Connecticut.

 

Generation No. 4

4. HEZEKIAH4 HOOKER (JOHN3, SAMUEL2, THOMAS1) was born 14 Oct 1688 in Farmington, Connecticut, and died 20 Feb 1756 in Woodbury, Connecticut. He married ABIGAIL CURTIS 18 Dec 1716. She was born 1695 in Stratford, Connecticut.

Notes for HEZEKIAH HOOKER:

The following is taken from the book entitled The Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker, Hartford, Connecticut, 1586-1908 (1909):

Hezekiah Hooker, son of John and Abigail (Standley) Hooker of Farmington, Conn., b. Oct. 14, 1688, at Farmington, Conn.; m. Dec. 18, 1716, Abigail Curtis, daughter of Capt. Josiah and Abigail (Judson) Curtis, of Stratford, Conn., b. 1695, at Stratford. About 1720, they removed to Woodbury, Conn., where he was a farmer in Bethlehem Parish. He died suddenly at Woodbury, Feb. 20, 1756.

CHILDREN OF HEZEKIAH HOOKER:

Hezekiah, Jr. b. Farmington, Conn., Oct. 30, 1717. *255 James, b. Farmington, Conn., Jan. 30, 1729.

Josiah, b. Woodbury, Conn., April 2, 1722; d. Norwalk, Conn., 1759; m. Hannah Cook.

Abigail, b. Woodbury, Conn., Sept. 25, 1724; d. Woodbury, Conn, Sept. 24, 1750; unmarried.

Mary, b. Woodbury, Conn., Jan. 8, 1727; m. Waitstill Goodrich, June 5, 1755.

William, b. Woodbury, Conn. June 20, 1729.

Jesse, b. Woodbury, Conn., Aug. 27, 1732; d. Woodbury, Conn., Sept. 24, 1750.

Eunice, b. Woodbury, Conn., Oct. 30, 1734; d. Woodbury, Conn., Sept. 17, 1750.

Asahel, b. Woodbury, Conn., Dec. 13, 1736.

Sarah, b. Woodbury, Conn., May 30, 1739.

 

Child of HEZEKIAH HOOKER and ABIGAIL CURTIS is:

5. i. ASAHEL5 HOOKER, b. 13 Dec 1736, Woodbury, Connecticut; d. 10 Nov 1810, Bristol, Connecticut.

 

Generation No. 5

5. ASAHEL5 HOOKER (HEZEKIAH4, JOHN3, SAMUEL2, THOMAS1) was born 13 Dec 1736 in Woodbury, Connecticut, and died 10 Nov 1810 in Bristol, Connecticut. He married ANNE PARMALEE 15 Feb 1760 in Woodbury, Connecticut. She was born Feb 1737 in Branford, Connecticut, and died 27 Oct 1811 in Bristol, Connecticut.

Notes for ASAHEL HOOKER:

The following is from the book entitled The Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker, Hartford, Connecticut, 1586-1908 (1909):

Asahel Hooker, son of Hezekiah and Abigail (Curtis) Hooker of Woodbury, Conn., b. Dec. 13, 1736, at Woodbury, Conn.; m. Feb. 15, 1760, Anne Parmalee, daughter of Jonathan and Sarah (Taylor) Parmalee of Branford (and Litchfield and Chatham) Conn., b. Feb. 1737. They removed from Woodbury to Bristol (then a part of Farmington) Conn., where he had a large farm near what is now the line between Bristol and Plainville, and he was also interested with his sons in manufacturing. He and his wife are buried in an old burial ground near the Bristol and Plainville line. He died at Bristol, Conn., Nov. 10, 1810. She died at Bristol, Conn. Oct. 27, 1811.

 

Child of ASAHEL HOOKER and ANNE PARMALEE is:

6. i. BRYAN6 HOOKER, b. 05 Aug 1764, Litchfield, Connecticut; d. 22 Jun 1826, Bristol, Connecticut.

 

Generation No. 6

6. BRYAN6 HOOKER (ASAHEL5, HEZEKIAH4, JOHN3, SAMUEL2, THOMAS1) was born 05 Aug 1764 in Litchfield, Connecticut, and died 22 Jun 1826 in Bristol, Connecticut. He married NANCY LEE 1804. She was born 30 Aug 1776 in Bristol, Connecticut, and died 09 May 1866 in Bristol, Connecticut.

Notes for BRYAN HOOKER:

The following is from the book entitled The Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker, Hartford, Connecticut, 1586-1908 as follows:

Bryan Hooker, son of Asahel and Anne (Parmalee) Hooker, of Woodbury and Bristol, Conn., b. Aug. 5, 1764; m. No. 1, 1790, Lydia Lewis, daughter of Eli and Anna Lewis of Bristol, Conn., b. Oct. 29, 1765. She died at Bristol, Conn., Apr. 20, 1804. He married No. 2, 1804, Widow Nancy (Lee) Fuller, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Gilbert) Lee, of Bristol, Conn., b. Aug. 30, 1776, at Bristol, Conn. By her first marriage Mrs. Fuller had two children, the eldest Rhoda Ann Fuller a pert little Miss of 9 years when her mother married Esquire Hooker, was very much opposed to her mother's marriage, and declaring that she would not be present at the marriage nor go with her mother to her new home, she left her mother, and took up her abode with her grandparents, who were not quite as well supplied with the luxuries of life as was Esquire Hooker. By advice of Mr. Hooker neither he nor his wife took any notice of the young miss, nor made any effort to induce her to come to them, and for a year neither of them saw her, no doubt very much to her surprise and disappointment, of course the Hookers and Lees being on good terms, often talked the matter over, and made their arrangements together. When a year had passed, Esquire Hooker drove in his carriage to the Lees' nominally upon business. After talking upon business matters, Mr. Hooker turned to the little girl and said "Miss Rhoda wouldn't you like to see your mother?" The little girl's eyes moistened and with quivering lips she replied "yes". "Well" said the Squire, "put on your things and get into the carriage and I will take you around to see your mother and when you get ready to come back I will bring you home." So the little miss went to her mother, and soon found that everything was so nice and comfortable, that she did not wish to return to the home of her grandparents, but remained there until her own marriage in 1815, to Samuel A. Mitchell, the cartographer, and took up her residence at Philadelphia, Penn. Mr. Hooker was extensively engaged in woolen goods manufacture. He died at Bristol, Conn., June 22, 1826. She died at Bristol, Conn., May 9,1866.

CHILDREN OF BRYAN AND NANCY HOOKER.

Lydia Lewis, b. Bristol, Conn., Aug. 8, 1805.

Nancy, b. Bristol, Conn., July 24, 1809.

Bryan Edward, b. Bristol, Conn., Jan. 1, 1813.

 

Child of BRYAN HOOKER and NANCY LEE is:

7. i. LYDIA7 LEWIS HOOKER, b. 08 Aug 1805, Bristol, Connecticut; d. 29 Apr 1877, Brooklyn, New York.

 

Generation No. 7

7. LYDIA7 LEWIS HOOKER (BRYAN6 HOOKER, ASAHEL5, HEZEKIAH4, JOHN3, SAMUEL2, THOMAS1) was born 08 Aug 1805 in Bristol, Connecticut, and died 29 Apr 1877 in Brooklyn, New York. She married CYRUS PORTER SMITH 06 Sep 1826, son of EDWARD SMITH and HANNAH CHANDLER. He was born 05 Apr 1800 in Hanover, New Hampshire, and died 13 Feb 1877 in Brooklyn, New York.

Notes for CYRUS PORTER SMITH:

Excerpt from book entitled A History of the City of Brooklyn, Volume 2, pages 262-263:

Cyrus Porter Smith, son of Edward and Hannah Smith, was born at Hanover, N. H., on the 5th of April, 1800. His father being a farmer, Cyrus, during his boyhood, worked on the farm, attending district schools in the winters and gaining such an education as is usually picked up by New England boys. The scanty lore thus obtained, however, so far from satisfying his craving for knowledge, served only to develop an earnest desire to go to college. That his father's slender means would not permit of this, was to the lad a matter of regret, but not an insurmountable obstacle. A liberal education he would have; so, after a season of preparation with his brother Noah, then in college, he entered Dartmouth, and managed, by teaching district schools in New Hampshire and Vermont, every winter, from the time he was eighteen years old, to pay his way through, graduating in 1824, with honor. He then commenced the study of law with chief justice T. S. Williams, of Hartford, Conn., and was admitted to practice in 1827. While at Hartford, he added to his somewhat scanty resources by teaching singing schools, during the winters, in various portions of the state, and, during one of these excursions in Bristol, became acquainted with the lady who subsequently became his wife. Having now secured his collegiate and professional education, he scanned the prospects in one part of the country and another, and finally determined to locate in the village of Brooklyn. Neither he nor any one else could have then anticipated the wonderful growth and prosperity of the place, though the energy, patience and self-reliance which Mr. Smith had already developed in securing his education would have naturally ensured his success in almost any place where he might have settled. But here his choice fell, and hither he came in September, 1827, from which time, until the following April, he neither saw a client nor made a dollar, and then his first fee was five dollars. But he would not be discouraged; and, though he could not compel business, he made friends, who stuck by him. He connected himself with Dr. Cox's (First Presbyterian) church, and was its chorister from 1827 to 1859.

During the Jackson presidential campaign of 1828, also, he came into public notice as an active whig. From 1833 to 1835 he was the clerk of the village board of trustees; and corporation counsel of the new city, from 1835 to 1839, enjoying, also, by this time, a practice equal to that of any lawyer in the city. In 1839, as we have seen, he was chosen mayor by the aldermen, the fourth which the city had had; and, at the first election by the people, in 1840, was chosen again, holding the office until 1842, a period, in all, of three years and four months. He was supervisor in the years 1836 and 1837; and, in 1848, for the purpose of furthering the establishment of a company to supply the city with gas, sought and obtained an election as alderman from the Third ward, and, to his efforts in the public councils and with private capitalists, was largely due the successful inception of Brooklyn's first gas company. Becoming interested, at an early period of his residence here, in the public schools (then under the care of school commissioners), he subsequently became a most active and influential member of the board of education, and was its president for the long period of twentyone years. The whole vast system of public education in Brooklyn, including, at present, thirty-six schools, attended by 60,000 children, at an annual cost of half a million of dollars, was put into practical operation during Mr. Smith's official connection, and when, in March, 1868, after thirty years connection with the cause of public education, he retired from office and from the board, his associates took occasion to offer their personal and official testimony to his long and important services.

In 1856 and '57, Mr. Smith represented the city in the state senate, where he held the position of chairman of the committee on commerce and navigation, to which was entrusted the important duty of definitely establishing the shore lines of the cities of New York and Brooklyn. In all that pertained to the ferry communication between these two cities, Mr. Smith always took a deep interest; and, at an early day, he became one of the associates of the Union Ferry Company, of which, since 1855, he has been managing director, superintending its vast interests with rare skill and fidelity.

In January, 1869, Mr. Smith was appointed the acting presidency of the Brooklyn City Rail Road Company, with which he has been connected for some years; and, thus, may be said, to hold in his grasp, at the present time, the combined management of the two most important interests of Brooklyn, viz : its means of egress and ingress, and its facilities of local travel and transportation; interests, we may add, which find their surest guaranty in the admirable and comprehensive executive abilities which he has always displayed in every position of public trust.

In the year 1839, during his first term of mayoralty, Mr. Smith, in connection with the late Gen. Robert Nichols, established a city hospital which, under his fostering care, became the present Brooklyn City Hospital, and has ever proved himself to this, as to other beneficent institutions, a most steady, influential and effective friend.

Few men, as will be seen from this brief sketch, have been more conspicuous in promoting the welfare and progress of Brooklyn, during the most important period of its growth and development (1830-1869) than Uncle Cyrus, as he is respectfully called by many of his oldest fellow citizens, and by thousands of the public school children who have grown up around him to positions of usefulness and trust. Never presumptuous in seeking public positions, but always faithful in the discharge of their duties, he has made a lasting impress upon his day and generation, and has secured the approbation of all wtto knew him.

THe following is an excerpt from the book entitled Sketches of the Alumni of Darmouth College by the Reverend George T. Chapman:

Cyrus Porter Smith, the son of Edward and Hannah (Chandler) Smith, was born at Hanover, Apr. 5, 1800. He taught at Bristol, Ct; read law at the same time with the Hon. Timothy Pitkin of Farmington, Ct, 1 year; then with the Hon. Thomas Scott Williams and the Hon. William Wolcott Ellsworth of Hartlbrd, Ct, 2 years; began practice at Brooklyn, N. Y. in Sept. 1827; was the Clerk and Atty of its corporation from May 1832, and its Counsel from May 1838; was Mayor of the city in 1839, 1840, 1841, and 1842 ; Master in Chancery from 1842 to 1844; also State Senator from Jan. 1856 to Jan. 1858; has been from 1851 Counsel and managing Director of the Union Ferry Co. between New York and Brooklyn cities. He married Lydia Lee, dau. of Bryan Hooker of Bristol, Sept. 6, 1826. Noah Smith, D. C. 1818, was his brother.

 

Children of LYDIA LEWIS and CYRUS SMITH are:

i. HELEN LOUISA8 SMITH, b. 20 Aug 1827, Brooklyn, New York; d. 27 Oct 1828, Brooklyn, New York.

ii. BRYAN HOOKER SMITH, b. 29 Jan 1829, Brooklyn, New York.

iii. CYRUS AUGUSTUS SMITH, b. 12 Nov 1830, Brooklyn, New York.

iv. EDWARD NOAH SMITH, b. 18 Oct 1832, Brooklyn, New York; d. 30 Aug 1843, Brooklyn, New York.

v. THEODORE EANES SMITH, b. 11 Aug 1835, Brooklyn, New York.

vi. CHANDLER PERRY SMITH, b. 31 Jul 1838, Brooklyn, New York; d. 20 Jan 1841, Brooklyn, New York.

vii. ELLEN LOUISA SMITH, b. 10 Feb 1841, Brooklyn, New York; d. 27 Jan 1915; m. WILLIS LORD OGDEN, 01 Jun 1870, New York; b. 21 Oct 1843, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; d. 27 Jul 1918, Kings County, New York.

Notes for ELLEN LOUISA SMITH:

Source for date of birth and marriage information is book entitled The Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker, Hartford, Connecticut, 1586-1908 (1909).

viii. WILLIAM CHANDLER SMITH, b. 17 May 1843, Brooklyn, New York; d. 02 May 1907, Brooklyn, New York.

Notes for WILLIAM CHANDLER SMITH:

Brooklyn Standard Union Newspaper, Obituary for 5 May 1907 as follows:

William C. SMITH, son of the late Cyrus Porter SMITH, Brooklyn's fourth Mayor, died last Friday night at his home, 136 Argyle road, Flatbush. He was in his sixty-fifth year [sic] and a life long resident of Brooklyn. Mr. SMITH served in the Civil War with the Twenty-third New York Regiment, as a member of the Brooklyn Club and several other organizations, and the First Presbyterian Church. A widow, Ruth YERBY, on daughter, Mrs. Sterling PETERS, and one son, Russell, survive him. The funeral services will be held to-morrow night at his late home and interment will be made at Greenwood Cemetery under the direction of Undertaker Joseph BISHOP, of 85 Henry street. Mr. SMITH's father was the first Mayor elected in Brooklyn by the suffrages of the people. He was also the first corporation counsel of Brooklyn and for many years was acting president of the Brooklyn City Railroad.

[Comment: If he was in his 65th year, a birth year of 1842 is indicated. However, the 1870 Federal Census indicates that he was then 35 years old - indicating a birth year of 1835.]

8. ix. CHARLES EDWARD SMITH, b. 27 May 1846, Brooklyn, New York; d. 01 Dec 1899, Brooklyn, New York.

 

Generation No. 8

8. CHARLES EDWARD8 SMITH (LYDIA7 LEWIS HOOKER, BRYAN6 HOOKER, ASAHEL5, HEZEKIAH4, JOHN3, SAMUEL2, THOMAS1) was born 27 May 1846 in Brooklyn, New York, and died 01 Dec 1899 in Brooklyn, New York. He married CORINNE COLMAN 28 Sep 1870 in New York, daughter of SAMUEL COLMAN and PAMELA CHANDLER. She was born 04 Jul 1834 in Portland, Maine, and died 1896 in Saint Andrews, Jamaica.

Notes for CHARLES EDWARD SMITH:

Source for date of birth is book entitled The Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker, Hartford, Connecticut, 1586-1908 (1909).

Charles Edward Smith's obituary appeared in the New York Times for 3 Dec 1899 as follows:

"SMITH - On Friday, Dec 1 at his residence in New York City, Charles Edward Smith, son the the late Cyrus P. Smith of Brooklyn, in the 53d year of his age. Funeral services will be held at the residence of his brother-in-law, Willis L. Ogden, 73 Pierrepont St., Brooklyn. on Sunday, Dec 3, at 2:30 o'clock."

 

Child of CHARLES SMITH and CORINNE COLMAN is:

i. CORINNE PAMELA COLMAN9 SMITH, b. 16 Feb 1878, Middlesex County, England; d. 18 Sep 1951, Bude, Cornwall.

 

 


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